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Devry Ethc 445 Week 7 Dq 2 Assemble and Test Your Personal Ethics Statement

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ETHC 445 Week 7 DQ 2 Assemble and Test Your Personal Ethics Statement
This week we will work on creating your own statement of personal ethics.
To get started, read summarizing review of our great and famous ethics and what they have taught us -- found in our lecture this week.
Then, let's work on creating one for you.
Your goal for the end of this thread is to have created a personal ethical philosophy and be able to tell your classmates from which philosophies you created it and why the contents are important and meaningful for you. List its precepts. (You will need to do this on the Final Exam.)
After you have assembled and posted your personal ethics statement, responded to what others may have said to you and thought about what you have posted to others, then take your statement and use it to work through the famous case of the Ring of Gyges.
One of the great examples of ethics and morals in all of literature comes from Plato who wrote about the Ring of Gyges in
The Republic, Book II, starting at paragraph 359a.
For those who wish to read the whole story, it is in the Doc Sharing tab and here is a link to the story -- Ring of Gyges.
The story goes that Gyges was a shepherd in the service of the King. In a most unusual circumstance he came upon a dead man, removed the man's ring, and discovered that it made him invisible. He conspired to take the periodic report of the shepherds to the King -- once there he seduced the Queen and eventually took control of the Kingdom by conspiring with the Queen. Plato continues the story:
"Suppose now that there were two such magic rings, and the just put on one of them and the unjust the other; no man can be imagined to be of such an iron nature that he would stand fast in justice. No man would...

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