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Julius Caesar 3

  • Date Submitted: 06/21/2011 07:12 AM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 54.3 
  • Words: 556
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porHis personality, as a man who values honor above all else, is a clue to the means of his death. The spirit delivers the message, "Thou shalt see me at Phillipi," (Act IV, Scene iii, Line 283) leading the reader to believe that Brutus will meet his end in the upcoming battle. In conclusion, Shakespeare has woven together many strands of clues and hints to create an intricate story of suspense, betrayal and honor. He ends up slaying himself rather than submitting to the humiliation of being captured by Antony and Octavius. Another character whose death is foreshadowed in the story is Cassius. Finally, Julius Caesar is riddled with clues to the fate of our protagonist, Brutus. But in Act IV it becomes more apparent that his end is near, as he becomes troubled with worries for the outcome of the battle while talking with Messala and Cassius. The give-away comes at the end of Act IV, Scene iii when Brutus is visited by the ghost of Caesar. Shakespeare foreshadows his death using both everyday and supernatural occurrences. Calpurnia even mentions to Caesar, "When beggars die, there are no comets seen; the heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes. In the end, his pride became his own downfall, for if he had heeded the warnings he may have survived. In addition, before the battle of Phillipi, Cassius confides in Messala his fears of death. During Act V, the battle of Phillipi, Cassius kills himself after misunderstanding the fate of his friend Titinius. He mentions the birds flying over his troops, casting a foreboding mood for the battle ahead, and says a fond farewell to Brutus. tend
His personality, as a man who values honor above all else, is a clue to the means of his death. The spirit delivers the message, "Thou shalt see me at Phillipi," (Act IV, Scene iii, Line 283) leading the reader to believe that Brutus will meet his end in the upcoming battle. In conclusion, Shakespeare has woven together many strands of clues and hints to create an intricate...

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