Words of Wisdom:

"If your ship comes in, row out to it." - Shawn9er

Narendranath

  • Date Submitted: 06/27/2011 09:02 PM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 39.9 
  • Words: 291
  • Essay Grade: no grades
  • Report this Essay
Narendranath Dutta was born in Shimla Pally, Kolkata, West Bengal, India on 12 January 1863 as the son of Viswanath Dutta and Bhuvaneswari Devi. Even as he was young, he showed a precocious mind and keen memory. He practiced meditation from a very early age. While at school, he was good at studies, as well as games of various kinds. He organized an amateur theatrical company and a gymnasium and took lessons in fencing, wrestling, rowing and other sports. He also studied instrumental and vocal music. He was a leader among his group of friends. Even when he was young, he questioned the validity of superstitious customs and discrimination based on caste and religion.
Vivekananda perhaps, is best remembered as the man who "stole the show" at the 1893 World Parliament of Religions in Chicago, Illinois, where he earned wild applause for beginning his address with the famous words, "Sisters and brothers of America." Vivekananda's arrival in the USA has been identified by many to mark the beginning of western interest in Hinduism not as merely an exotic eastern oddity, but as a vital religious and philosophical tradition that might actually have something important to teach the West. Within a few years of the Parliament, he had started Vedantic centers in New York City, New York and London, lectured at major universities and generally kindled western interest in Hinduism. His success was not without controversy, much of it from Christian missionaries of whom he was fiercely critical, but some from Western academics and Indian journalists, who questioned his bombastic claims to have conquered America with the Vedanta philosophy. After four years of constant touring, lecturing and retreats in the West, he came back to India in the year 1897.

Comments

Express your owns thoughts and ideas on this essay by writing a grade and/or critique.

  1. No comments