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Presumed Innocent by Scott Turow

  • Date Submitted: 08/17/2011 07:47 PM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 50.3 
  • Words: 644
  • Essay Grade: no grades
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The chief deputy prosecuting attorney is Rusty Sabich, the protagonist and narrator. He is quickly described as talented, intelligent, and not a fool, but loyal to his boss, Raymond Horgan, who is running for reelection. Horgan is described as a sharp and self-interested politician but also a highly capable attorney, which Rusty admires. They have worked together for twelve years. Rusty has a wife, Barbara, and a son, Nat. He loves them both but is having obstacles with his wife, especially since his affair with a coworker, Carolyn Polhemus, who now has been murdered apparently by a rapist. It becomes clear that Rusty is a caring, sensitive and honest but yet also can be manipulative and secretive when necessary while doing his job. His character has a light side and a dark side that becomes prevalent as the book progresses. His attraction and emotions toward the novels murder victim also affects him. Following her murder his emotions and devotions to her blatantly obvious, yet he never seems to show control over his emotions. The antagonists of the story seem to be both Nico Della Guardia and Tommy Molto. Nico is relentless and confident. He is not particularly smart but dresses well, and knows how to brown nose. Molto is Guardia’s right hand man he’s nicknamed the Mad Monk and is ineffective in court. The role of the prosecutor in this story is to try and convict Rusty Sabich of the supposed murder and rape of Carolyn Polhemus. Most of the second half of the book takes place in the courtroom. Rusty's personal life at home and his out-of-court investigations continue in the preceding chapters that alternate with the courtroom scenes, a good strategy that moves the plot forward even as ample space for further development of Rusty's personality and background. A kind of subplot involving a law enforcement corruption case is pursued by Rusty and Lipranzer throughout much of the book because of its potential to shed light on the murder of Carolyn. The development of...

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