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Dualism

  • Date Submitted: 10/16/2011 03:04 PM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 46 
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When we were children, we were taught that ball is in a round shape; we were taught what good is or what evil is; and we were taught that the angle sum of a triangle is 180 etc. We use the knowledge listed above with confidence almost every day, however, we do not know where these concepts come from. Who gave these correct concepts to mankind? Is it from God, or simply because the folds on our brain make us think so? When we are thinking the problems like these, we have to talk about the concept of innate which

Related link: Dscartes link in study guide for final
Mind an dbody problem in second half reading
for mind and body problem on 4/6 in course documents
(http://www.allaboutphilosophy.org/cartesian-dualism-faq.htm)
What is Cartesian dualism? 

Dualism is an ancient concept that was deeply rooted in Greek thought. However, long before that, the ancient scriptures taught that mankind was made in God’s image and that Adam needed the spirit breathed into him before becoming a living soul. Almost 2000 years after Plato and Aristotle reasoned that the human mind or soul could not be identified with the physical body, Rene Descartes (Rene Descartes (1596-1650) marks the beginning of modern psychology. He was a remarkable individual: primarily a philosopher, he was also a scientist, physiologist, and a mathematician.) reinforced this concept and gave it a name, dualism. The word “Cartesius” is simply the Latin form of the name Descartes. Consequently, Cartesian dualism is simply Descartes concept of dualism. 

Descartes’ famous saying epitomizes the dualism concept. He said, “cogito ergo sum,” “I reflect therefore I am.” Descartes held that the immaterial mind and the material body are two completely different types of substances and that they interact with each other. He reasoned that the body could be divided up by removing a leg or arm, but the mind or soul were indivisible. 

This concept is difficult to accept for those with a secular humanist,...

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