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"Mishaps are like knives that either serve us or cut us, as we grasp them by the blade or the handle- Herman Melville (Moby Dick author)" - Teacher

Dumpster Diving

  • Date Submitted: 12/20/2011 03:29 PM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 70.6 
  • Words: 608
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Some people may think that once you throw something in the garbage it is no longer usable and has no value, but that is not always true. In "On Dumpster Diving" written by Lars Eighner, he tells us about his experience with dumpster diving. When he became homeless, he had no other choice but to make a living out of dumpster diving and throughout his experience he learned many things. He learned to look at an objects in a totally different way and also to give them a new value, something not many people can do.
Throughout his homeless experience, Eighners learned a really important and valuable lesson. "I find from the experience of scavenging two rather deep lessons. The first is to take what I can use and let the rest go by. I have come to think that there is no value in the abstract. A thing I cannot use or make useful, perhaps by trading, has no value however fine or rare it may be. I mean useful in a broad sense--so for example, some art I would think useful and valuable, but other art might be otherwise for me". Eighners knows his limits when it comes to knowing the value of things. He knows wether or not they are worth picking up and if they are, he know how to give it a greater value then before. He is not a hoarder and he doesn't pick up everything he sees laying around, just the things that are necessary for him.
"The second lesson is of the transience of material being. This has not quiet converted me to a dualist, but it has made some headway in that direction. I do not suppose that ideas are immortal, but certainly mental things are longer-lived than other material things. Once I was the sort of person who invests material objects with sentimental value. Now I no longer have those things, but I have the sentimental yet". Throughout his experience, Eighners learned to look at object in a new way. Not only to look at the economical value but also the sentimental value of an object. He lost many things including his home, clothes, objects and many...

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