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A Day at Lahjung

  • Date Submitted: 10/15/2015 06:31 AM
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CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

0500/02

FIRST LANGUAGE ENGLISH
Paper 2 Reading and Directed Writing

May/June 2003
2 hours 15 minutes
Additional Materials:

Answer Booklet/Paper

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST
If you have been given an Answer Booklet, follow the instructions on the front cover of the Booklet.
Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen on both sides of the paper.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
Answer all questions.
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.
Dictionaries are not permitted.

This document consists of 7 printed pages and 1 blank page.
SP (NF) S35155/5
© CIE 2003

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Part 1
Read Passage A and Passage B carefully; then answer Questions 1 and 2.
Passage A

Life on Inishmaan
This passage is part of an account written 100 years ago by J. M. Synge.
Synge went to live on Inishmaan, a remote island off the west coast of Ireland.
This passage describes his first journey to his new home, and his impressions of it.
Early this morning the man of the house came over for me with a curagh—that is, a
boat with four rowers and four oars on either side, as each man uses two—and we set
off a little before noon.
It gave me a moment of exquisite satisfaction to find myself moving away from
civilisation in this rough canvas canoe of a type that has served primitive races since
people first went on the sea.
We had to stop for a moment at a vessel that is anchored in the bay, to make some
arrangements for the fish-processing. When we started again, a small sail was run up
in the bow, and we set off across the water with a leaping up-and-down motion that
had no resemblance to the heavy...

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