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Eqyptian Amulet Art

  • Date Submitted: 01/28/2010 07:19 AM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 48 
  • Words: 1306
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An amulet is a small object that a person wears, carries, or offers to a deity because he or she believes that it will magically give a particular power or form of protection. The conviction that a symbol, form, or concept provides protection, promotes well-being, or brings good luck is common to all societies: in our own, we commonly wear religious symbols, carry a favorite penny, or a rabbit\'s foot. In ancient Egypt, amulets might be carried, used in necklaces, bracelets, or rings, and—especially—placed among a mummy\'s bandages to ensure the deceased a safe, healthy, and productive afterlife.

Egyptian amulets functioned in a number of ways. Symbols and deities generally conferred the powers they represent. Small models that represent known objects, such as headrests or arms and legs, served to make sure those items were available to the individual or that a specific need could be addressed. Magic contained in an amulet could be understood not only from its shape. Material, color, scarcity, the grouping of several forms, and words said or ingredients rubbed over the amulet could all be the source for magic granting the possessor\'s wish.

Small amulets of faience, stone, ceramic, metal, or glass, were common possessions in ancient Egypt. They were most often fashioned in the form of gods and goddesses or of animals sacred to those deities. Amulets gave their owners magical protection from a wide variety of ills and evil forces, including sickness, infertility, and death in childbirth. They were often provided with loops so they could be strung and worn like a necklace. Some amulets were made to place on the body of the deceased in order to protect the soul in the hereafter.





 

Vervet Monkey



Vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) are depicted as exotic household pets as early as the Old Kingdom, walking on a lead beside the noble tomb-owners prize hounds. In the New Kingdom one is often shown tied...

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