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How Does Mary Shelley's Narrative Encourage the Reader to Make Links Between the Personalities, Experiences and Moral Conduct of Robert Walton, Victor Frankenstein and the Creature?

  • Date Submitted: 05/11/2010 06:00 AM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 52.2 
  • Words: 1009
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Shelly use of narrative with each of the three different characters in Frankenstein shows strong links in personality, experiences and moral conduct of each of the narrators.   Being in narrative the entire book is written in first person, so anything that is written is the view or opinion of the person whose narration it is, therefore the reader cannot completely trust what is being said.   Each of the characters has a main underlying desire to find friendship and love, which drives them throughout the story.   The lack of companionship is something that they all lack and each of them goes about finding it, and filling the void in their lives, in different ways.
Victor Frankenstein is the most complex character in the story and throughout he is torn between his desire for scientific gain, with God like power, and his morals which end up tearing him apart.   Frankenstein’s has an obsessive personality which stems from his passion for science and in particular the desire to recreate life, this personality eventually spirals out of control and ends up killing him.   Victor has very few close friends and this leads to a moral downfall in his life and eventually to him creating the Creature.   As the story develops Victor’s morals desert him more and all he can think about is gaining revenge for the Creatures murders.   Victor thinks that he has done something the world will thank him for when he originally creates the creature. He is proud of what he has made, but as the story continues he realises that giving life, and therefore giving himself a God like status, which leads to his eventual downfall.   Victor cuts himself off from the outside world in his desire to pursue his studies, this makes him lose touch with reality which shows when his animalistic desire to destroy the creature in the latter parts of the book.   Victor refuses to admit that the Creature is his fault, not for making him but the way that he treated him, even when the Creatures actions are spiralling out...

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