Words of Wisdom:

"imagination is key, but the stars create imagination! (daaaaa crab!)" - Ytiema

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  • Date Submitted: 02/18/2012 01:00 AM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 46 
  • Words: 460
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Friedrich Kuhlau
Friedrich Daniel Rudolf Kuhlau (11 September 1786   – 12 March 1832) was a German-Danish composer during the Classical and Romantic periods. He was a central figure of the Danish Golden Age.
During his lifetime, he was known primarily as a concert pianist and composer of Danish opera, but was responsible for introducing many of Beethoven's works, which he greatly admired, to Copenhagen audiences. Considering that his house burned down destroying all of his unpublished manuscripts, he was a prolific composer leaving more than 200 published works in most genres.

Baldassare Galuppi
Baldassare Galuppi (18 October 1706 – 3 January 1785) was an Italian composer, born on the island of Burano in the Venetian Republic. He achieved international success, spending periods of his career in London and Saint Petersburg, but his main base remained Venice, where he held a succession of leading appointments.
Originally for piano, this Adagio has been elegantly transcribed for the brass quintet. It has been scored as a lyrical horn feature but all parts are interesting and everyone gets a break. Lyrical pieces, such as this one, have many uses including weddings, concerts and church services. All parts are fairly easy and would require very little rehearsal time to prepare.

Edward MacDowell
Edward Alexander MacDowell (December 18, 1860[1] – January 23, 1908) was an American composer and pianist of the Romantic period. He was best known for his second piano concerto and his piano suites "Woodland Sketches", "Sea Pieces", and "New England Idylls". "Woodland Sketches" includes his most popular short piece, "To a Wild Rose". In 1904 he was one of the first seven Americans honored by membership in the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Joseph Kosma
Kosma was born József Kozma in Budapest, where his parents taught stenography and typing. He had a brother, Akos. A maternal relative was the photographer László Moholy-Nagy, and another relative was the...

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