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Sherlock Holmes 2

  • Date Submitted: 05/22/2011 05:55 AM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 50.1 
  • Words: 583
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This mystery, a completed Sherlock Holmes story, was found in 1942 by a Conan Doyle biographer, Hesketh Pearson, searching through a box of Doyle’s papers. It was originally announced that the story would not be published by the Doyle estate, but it was announced it certainly was by Doyle, as the manuscript supposedly appeared in his own handwriting. However, according to Jon L. Lellenberg in Nova 57 Minor, the manuscript was not in Conan Doyle's handwriting, but typewritten. The Strand Magazine published extracts from it in August 1943, and was finally published after demand from Sherlock Holmes societies in 1947, when it was embraced as a new (if slightly inferior) part of the canon by The Baker Street Irregulars amongst others.[16] Initial suspicions of forgery were reported by Vincent Starret[17] and it was eventually discovered by Hesketh Pearson that the story was originally written by Arthur Whitaker, who had sent it to Conan Doyle in hope of a collaboration. Doyle had bought the story, in the thought that he might use the idea at a later date, but he never did. Pearson, Green, Tracy and the Doyle estate agree that Whitaker wrote the story, though Haining still claims that “the opening scene between Holmes and Watson betrays the hand of the master,” and that the story is partly written by Conan Doyle. He points out that Doyle's wife, sons and biographer were fooled by the style, and it is possible there was a redraft made.[18] The story is published in Penguin's The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes collection under the title of The Adventure of the Sheffield Banker.
"The Adventure of the Two Collaborators" (first published 1923)
Though never claimed by any serious critic to be a Conan Doyle work, this parody is listed here due to a popular misconception that this was written by Doyle for his friend, J. M. Barrie (of Peter Pan fame). (Perhaps contributing to this misconception is the fact that the play appears for the first time only in a work of Conan...

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