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William Tecumseh Sherman and His March to the Sea

  • Date Submitted: 01/28/2010 06:28 AM
  • Flesch-Kincaid Score: 61.7 
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William Tecumseh Sherman was born on May 8, 1820 in Lancaster,  


 


  Ohio.   He was educated at the U.S. Military Academy and later went on to  


 


  become a Union General in the U.S. civil war.   Sherman resigned from the  


 


  army in 1853 and became a partner in a banking firm in San Francisco.   He  


 


  became the president of the Military College in Louisiana(now Louisiana state  


 


  University) from 1859-1861.   Sherman offered his services at the outbreak of  


 


  the Civil War in 1861 and was put in command of a volunteer infantry  


 


  regiment, becoming a brigadier general of volunteers after the first Battle of  


 


  bull run.   He led his division at the Battle of Shiloh and was then promoted to  


 


  major general of volunteers.   Soon after Sherman fought in the battle of  


 


  Chattanooga he was made supreme commander of the armies in the west.  


 


  Sherman fought many battles with such people as Ulysses S. Grant, and  


 


  against people such as Robert E. Lee before he was commissioned lieutenant  


 


  general of the regular army.   Following Grants election to presidency he was  


 


  promoted to the rank of full general and given command of the entire U.S.  


 


  Army.   William Sherman published his personal memoirs in 1875, retired in  


 


  1883, and died in 1891.


 


   


          William Tecumseh Sherman, as you have read, was a very talented and  


 


  very successful man.   He is remembered by many accomplishments, but  


 


  probably most remembered by his famous March to the sea. Sherman's  


 


  march to the sea was probably the most celebrated military action, in which  


 


  about sixty thousand men marched...

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